DAVID FLYNN
ARCHITECTS
Front elevation

Sandymount


A 1960s semi-d in Sandymount is refurbished and extended with a new two-storey addition to the rear. At ground floor level, an offset in the plan allows Southlight to reach the back of the house.

Residential Extension: 37m2, Refurbishment: 115m2

House rear elevation
Drawing rear elevation

This 1950s semi-detached house lies in the heart of Sandymount. The inefficient layout with a compact kitchen overlooking the long, north facing garden was ill fitted to modern family life.

While maintaining the character of the existing front facade and Dublin streetscape, the internal spaces are to be reconfigured to create large, open plan spaces.

A two storey extension pushes out from the rear of the house, accommodating a double bedroom and spacious kitchen living dining area which stretches into the garden. A series of roof lights with sclupted plaster downstand bulkheads flood the wall and space with light throughout the day, creating a warm, bright family area.

The two-storey garden elevation has evolved from carefully considered domestic and functional considerations to become a layered play of interlocking planes with a somewhat industrial character. As opposed to treating drainpipes and gutters as after thoughts, they are incorporated into the design. The tall aluminium rainwater pipe and box gutter are prominent articulating features of the rear façade.

Garden view
Views from a large window are framed by a brick pier and ledge. Low furniture allows uninterrupted views of the garden beyond.

Interior view of living dining space

Garden view
Views from a large window are framed by a brick pier and ledge. Low furniture allows uninterrupted views of the garden beyond.

Context model
The site is located close to a corner where the houses are arranged quite close to each other. The extension was carefully laid out so as to have no impact on adjoining propertoies and be exempt from planning.

Solar orientation diagram
The main spaces to the rear of the house have a northerly orientation.

Site location timber model

Context model
The site is located close to a corner where the houses are arranged quite close to each other. The extension was carefully laid out so as to have no impact on adjoining propertoies and be exempt from planning.

Site plan

Solar orientation diagram
The main spaces to the rear of the house have a northerly orientation.

Living room rooflight
A series of narrow rooflights allow warm Southerly light to penetrate deep into the living spaces throughout the day.

Brick ledge
A low brick ledge wraps around the perimeter of the new open plan space forming shelving and window seats as desired.

Living room rooflights

Living room rooflight
A series of narrow rooflights allow warm Southerly light to penetrate deep into the living spaces throughout the day.

Brick ledge detail

Brick ledge
A low brick ledge wraps around the perimeter of the new open plan space forming shelving and window seats as desired.

Rainwater detail
A square rainwater pipe is recessed into the brickwork drawing the eye up to a tall zinc cap.

Detail of brick rear elevation

Rainwater detail
A square rainwater pipe is recessed into the brickwork drawing the eye up to a tall zinc cap.

Exploded Axonometric
The extension responds to the unpredictable weather and climate in Dublin – capturing evening sunlight through the series of rooflights while a feature downpipe collects rainwater from the flat roof.

Detail of brick rear elevation

Exploded Axonometric
The extension responds to the unpredictable weather and climate in Dublin – capturing evening sunlight through the series of rooflights while a feature downpipe collects rainwater from the flat roof.

Inside-outside
Brick pier and ledge extend from outside to inside, separated only by a black frame.

Detail of brick ledge and windows

Inside-outside
Brick pier and ledge extend from outside to inside, separated only by a black frame.

Ground Floor Plan
The rear extension pushes out into the garden allowing greater access, views and sunlight. The plan is offset away from the boundary to allow sunlight to penetrate from early evening onward, flooding the space with warm Westerly light. A converted garage to the front creates a new unified elevation while providing a new playroom and efficient utility room.

First Floor Plan
A new double bedroom aligns with the extension below to be as economic as possible. A large window overlooks the rear garden and allows evening light to fill the space while remaining planning exempt. An efficient layout creates a more generous family bathroom, a new master ensuite and ample storage spaces.

House plans

Floorplans
The rear extension pushes out into the garden allowing greater access, views and sunlight.

On the first floor, a new double bedroom aligns with the extension below to be as economical as possible.

A plasterboard bulkhead and white counter wrap around the kitchen workspace. Built-in shelving niches sit between these creating a minimalist recessed kitchen with clean lines and ample storage space.

Interior view of kitchen

A plasterboard bulkhead and white counter wrap around the kitchen workspace. Built-in shelving niches sit between these creating a minimalist recessed kitchen with clean lines and ample storage space.

Sectional Perspective
A line of rooflights to the side of the kitchen / dining / living space admits warm Southerly light. Curved soffits between them give a sculptural play of light.

Living room rooflights
Curved beams create a soft, almost ethereal atmosphere on cloudy afternoons.

Sectional perspective

Sectional Perspective
A line of rooflights to the side of the kitchen / dining / living space admits warm Southerly light. Curved soffits between them give a sculptural play of light.

Detail of the rooflights and soffits

Living room rooflights
Curved beams create a soft, almost ethereal atmosphere on cloudy afternoons.

Living room rooflights
Sculptural curved plasterboard reflects and bounces light into the north-facing space creating different experiences every day.

Interior view of living room rooflights

Living room rooflights
Sculptural curved plasterboard reflects and bounces light into the north-facing space creating different experiences every day.

Kitchen window
The brick ledge continues into the kitchen creating a deep brick window seat. This allows easy access a new herb garden in brick planters which sit just outside within arm's lenght.

Interior view of kitchen window

Kitchen window
The brick ledge continues into the kitchen creating a deep brick window seat. This allows easy access a new herb garden in brick planters which sit just outside within arm's lenght.

Rainwater detail
New brickwork contrasts sharp black rainwater pipe.

Rear elevation
The new two-storey extension sits within the brick surroundings of Sandymount. New living spaces over-look the garden through a large glazed screen.

Rainwater and brick pier detail

Rainwater detail
New brickwork contrasts sharp black rainwater pipe.

Rear elevation

Rear elevation
The new two-storey extension sits within the brick surroundings of Sandymount. New living spaces over-look the garden through a large glazed screen.

The original house was a typical 1960s semi-d but with some unusual details such as Roman profiled roof tiles, extended areas to the side of the house and a robust in-situ concrete construction not often found in speculative housing.
Photo: David Flynn Architects

Location
Sandymount, Dublin

Completion
May 2019

Design Team Leader
David Flynn Architects Ltd.

Architects
(Concept, Planning, Detailed Design & Construction)

David Flynn Architects Ltd.

Health & Safety Project Supervisor (Design Stage)
David Flynn Architects Ltd.

Structural Engineer
PCA Consulting Engineers

Quantity Surveyor (preliminary costing)
FMMP

Main Contractor
Drumlargan Construction Ltd.

Foreman
Martin O'Neill

Concept visualisations
David Flynn Architects Ltd.

Existing rear elevation

The original house was a typical 1960s semi-d but with some unusual details such as Roman profiled roof tiles, extended areas to the side of the house and a robust in-situ concrete construction not often found in speculative housing.
Photo: David Flynn Architects

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